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The works of Dionysius the Areopagite Vol. 2 - J. Parker (1899)

The works of Dionysius the Areopagite Vol. 2

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Learn about The works of Dionysius the Areopagite Vol. 2 :

Alexandria became the home of Christian Philosophy, but Athens was its birthplace. Pantaenus and Ammonius-Saccus were chief founders of the Alexandrine School. They were both Christian. They both drew their teaching from the Word of God, ” the Fountain of Wisdom,” and from the writings of Hierotheus, and Dionysius the Areopagite —Bishops of Athens. For several centuries there had been a Greek preparation for the Alexandrine School. As the Old Testament was a Schoolmaster, leading to Christ, so the Septuagint, Pythagoras, Plato, Aristobulus, Philo, and Apollos were heralds who prepared the minds of men for that fulness of light and truth in Jesus Christ, which, in Alexandria, clothed itself in the bright robes of Divine Philosophy.

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Learn about The works of Dionysius the Areopagite Vol. 2 :

Alexandria became the home of Christian Philosophy, but Athens was its birthplace. Pantaenus and Ammonius-Saccus were chief founders of the Alexandrine School. They were both Christian. They both drew their teaching from the Word of God, ” the Fountain of Wisdom,” and from the writings of Hierotheus, and Dionysius the Areopagite —Bishops of Athens. For several centuries there had been a Greek preparation for the Alexandrine
School. As the Old Testament was a Schoolmaster, leading to Christ, so the Septuagint, Pythagoras, Plato, Aristobulus, Philo, and Apollos were heralds who prepared the minds of men for that fulness of light and truth in Jesus Christ, which, in Alexandria, clothed itself in the bright robes of Divine Philosophy.

Pantaenus was born in Athens, a.d. i2o, and died in Alexandria, a.d. 213. He was Greek by nationality, and Presbyter of the Church in Alexandria by vocation. First, Stoic, then Pythagorean, he became Christian some time before a.d. 186, at which date he was appointed chief instructor in the Didaskeleion, by Demetrius, Bishop of Alexandria. Pantseniis recognised the preparation for the Christian Faith in the Greek Philosophy. Anastasius-Sinaita describes him as “one of the early expositors who agreed with each other in treating the first six days of Creation as prophetic of Christ and the whole Church.”

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