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LightWorker™ Knights of Saint Columba

£9.99


Learn About LightWorker™ Knights of Saint Columba :

Columba (or Columkille in Gaelic) is usually associated with the beautiful little island of Iona, in the Inner Hebrides, off the west coast of Scotland. His name, both in Latin and Gaelic, means “dove”. He was certainly neither the first, nor the last, representative of the significant Celtic Christian tradition, found in Scotland, Ireland, Northumberland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. Nevertheless, Columba is the most renowned of all the early saints of Scotland. Other great names in the Celtic tradition include Ninian (who founded an early church and monastery in Scotland, known as Candida Casa [white house] at Whithorn in 397 AD) and Patrick, the Patron saint of Ireland, born in Scotland, near Dumbarton.

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Product Description


Learn About LightWorker™ Knights of Saint Columba :

Columba (or Columkille in Gaelic) is usually associated with the beautiful little island of Iona, in the Inner Hebrides, off the west coast of Scotland. His name, both in Latin and Gaelic, means “dove”. He was certainly neither the first, nor the last, representative of the significant Celtic Christian tradition, found in Scotland, Ireland, Northumberland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. Nevertheless, Columba is the most renowned of all the early saints of Scotland. Other great names in the Celtic tradition include Ninian (who founded an early church and monastery in Scotland, known as Candida Casa [white house] at Whithorn in 397 AD) and Patrick, the Patron saint of Ireland, born in Scotland, near Dumbarton.

The Celtic church was rich in artistry, particularly in its sculptured stones (that frequently imported symbols from earlier pre-Christian religions) and many wonderfully illuminated manuscripts. There was also a strong ascetic monastic tradition, with  emphasis on study, prayer and contemplation. The monastery, under an Abbot, rather than a diocese under a bishop was the favoured organisation in the Celtic church. The Celtic church varied from the Roman church also on matters such as the calculation of the date of Easter and the shape of the monks’ tonsure.

 

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